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Archive for the ‘sailing’ Category

The Summer Issue of Yachting Times Magazine is out and my Tech & Gear column includes reviews on…

SEA-TAGS_2

Sea-Tags Man Over Board (MOB) Wristband Alarm System

CMS4 COMMANDER HERO BLACK MULTI ZONE

Clarion’s New Line of Marine Audio – Guaranteed to Satisfy the Sea-Going Music Lover

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Sun flare Flexible Solar Panels

Read this column and the entire magazine online here!

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Review of Aqualuma Gen 4 Series Thru-hull LEDs, Aquatic AV BlueCube & Mariner Amphibious DRONE. Yachting Times Magazine, Spring 2015, page 66.

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http://yachtingtimesmagazine.com/issue/18spring2015/pageflip.html

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Ginny Osterholt Filiatraut wasn’t just a friend, she was a pioneer and a mentor, who helped me steer a course through often times murky waters. Ginny lost her battle with aggressive ovarian cancer at the age of 78, after a courageous fight. Her husband Jacques was at her side always as was their dog Buddy at their home in Punta Gorda, Florida.

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Ginny in her home SSCA office back in 1977. Photo courtesy Ginny Filiatrault

I got to know Ginny when I was Editor of the Commodore’s Bulletin for the Seven Seas Cruising Association (SSCA). I had recently landed in Fort Lauderdale after my husband and I had cruised from California, taking four years to cruise. It was my first job as an editor and since Ginny had held the very same position (as well as Office Manager, Treasurer, Secretary and Director of the Board!), and she always had both words of encouragement as well as direction for me.

Moving on to cruising magazines after my three-year stint, I kept in touch with Ginny via email and  tried to offer her the same support she gave me when she would run up against push-back with a new Board of Directors or expressed her opinions about how the organization should be run.

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Ginny and Jacques aboard Jonathan, Jacques 42-foot custom ketch. Photo courtesy Ginny Filiatrault.

 

Ginny became Editor in 1975, helping to move the fledgeling organization from California to South Florida. SSCA went with her when ever she moved and her enthusiasm for the group never wavered. Born on October 3, 1936, she was an only child who started sailing early, at the age of 9. She helped her dad build a sailing dinghy to sail around in Santa Monica, California and later, at age 12 she lived aboard a 34′ Seagoer yawl with her dad. By the age of 15, she bought her own 12′ lap-strake sailing dinghy to rebuild. She met the founders of the SSCA who lived aboard in Coronado and joined in 1955 when she was living aboard her 37′ Hanna Carol, Bojac (a requirement back then!) and just 18 years old. Over the 55 years that she was involved with SSCA, she contributed immensely. In her own words, Ginny described her first experiences as a live aboard in San Diego…

We were a very close knit family and shared the dream of cruising and living aboard! Camaradarie was strong as we caringly helped each other in so many ways as were the SSCA traditions formed by our Founders in 1952!” (SSCA Commodore’s Bulletin, November 2007).

Ginny with SSCA Director Steve Leeds at the 2007 Gam in Melbourne, Florida.

Ginny with SSCA Director Steve Leeds at the 2007 Gam in Melbourne, Florida.

She spent the last six months of her life working tirelessly again for SSCA, gathering all of her photos of her time with the organization, some 90 albums, for scanning, and was finally honored recently with the title of SSCA Historian. She would have celebrated 60 years as an SSCA Commodore this June.

It was her tenacity, talent and trust that made her a lifetime sailor and often times a thorn in the side of SSCA’s directors and managers. She always had an opinion and wasn’t shy about sharing it, often in the form of long-winded emails to everyone on her list. Though there were times when she was “off-base” with regard to a given topic, Ginny usually had something to say that needed to be heard. She was truly the glue that kept this important organization together. Her truth will be missed.

88’s Dear One…

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Ginny holds a photo of herself with another Lifetime Commodore, Babe Baldwin.

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Ginny, Jacques and Buddy. Photo courtesy of Ginny Filiatrault.

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Photo courtesy Ginny Filiatrault.

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YTM-Autumn-2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download PDF Here:

YTM Autumn 2014-tech

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The following courtesy of: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/sep/20/two-britons-missing-yacht-mexican-hurricane

Two Britons are missing after hurricane Odile swept through Mexico’s Baja California peninsula last Sunday.

The BBC reported the couple were Paul Whitehouse, from Wolverhampton, and Simone Wood, from London, both in their 40s.

The two were reported missing aboard a yacht in the Sea of Cortez on Friday, and Mexican marines and sailors were taking part in a search operation.

Their yacht was one of 25 that capsized in the hurricane, the BBC said. It is thought Whitehouse worked as a scuba instructor in the city of La Paz.

A spokeswoman for the Foreign Office said: “We are in touch with the local authorities and are providing consular assistance to the families at this difficult time.”

The British embassy in Mexico has advised British nationals in those areas of Baja California and Baja California Sur affected by the hurricane to leave through Los Cabos international airport.

A spokesman for the embassy told the BBC: “We are urgently working with authorities on the ground in Mexico to ensure the safety of British nationals following hurricane Odile, and have sent staff from our embassy to assist in this.”

The hurricane affected power and water supplies, as well as phone services, triggering widespread looting. Three other people, a German and two South Koreans, are known to have died.

Power has been restored to about one-fifth of customers in the resort cities of Los Cabos, with 200 electricity workers dispatched to the area.


Posted on the Cruisers Network Online – Yahoo Group

Unfortunately, Simone was found dead in the mangroves yesterday. The most complete information I’ve found is collected on the Charlie’s Charts Facebook page from a variety of sources, including the radio nets.
http://www.facebook.com/CharliesCharts.

For anyone who wishes to donate, Club Cruceros de La Paz has set up a donation site: http://www.gofundme.com/en7dtw.  I was a member  of Club Cruceros when we were in that area and saw the work they  do to coordinate the work during disasters. I trust them to do
well with the money collected, both for those who lost boats and the volunteers who are actually doing the work (there’s no such thing as SeaTow, it’s all volunteers to get the boats off the beaches/rocks/mangroves and remove the navigation hazards).

Carolyn Shearlock
TheBoatGalley.com <http://theboatgalley.com/>  &  The Boat Galley Cookbook

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Here’s my latest Tech Review in Yachting Times Magazine – America’s Bilingual Boating Magazine – Always available online!

ytm-cvr-sum-2014YTM-Summer-2014-tech

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From: Boat US News:

It’s over 70 years old, a thin magenta-colored line appearing on over 50 different navigational charts covering the Atlantic Coast and Gulf, snaking along the route of the Intracoastal Waterway. Now, thanks to NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey and a public-private partnership with Active Captain, an interactive cruising guidebook, NOAA will be updating the “magenta line” on all of its newly-issued navigational charts to help keep boaters in safe waters. Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS) submitted comments on the proposal to NOAA, who had initially proposed removing the line entirely. However, responding to BoatUS’ and other boaters’ comments, NOAA will tap into users of Active Captain to update the route in an on-going effort that will benefit the boating community.

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The thin magenta colored line marking the Intracoastal Waterway is like a yellow brick road for boaters transiting the East and Gulf Coasts. Credit: Boat US

“Some boaters had assumed the magenta line, which was last updated in 1935, was a precise route through safe waters,” said BoatUS Government Affairs Senior Program Coordinator David Kennedy. “However, over time the forces of nature made the line inaccurate as shoals shifted and underwater topography changed, leading some boats into shallows, over dangerous obstructions, or even into land. We thank NOAA for a change of course in keeping the magenta line, listening to boaters and coming up with a creative public-private partnership that recognizes the value of this important guide to navigation.”
The magenta line appears in charts covering all Intracoastal waters, and is essentially two distinct routes along the eastern US and Gulf Coasts totaling about 3,000 miles in length. Said Captain Shep Smith, chief of NOAA’s Coast Survey’s Marine Chart Division, “Today’s decision to reinstate the magenta line is not a quick fix. It will take at least three years to fix problems that were 70 years in the making.”

Boaters may contribute to the updating effort by joining Active Captain at www.activecaptain.com.

Jeffrey Siegel, owner of ActiveCaptain said in his recent newsletter, “In September 2013, US/NOAA began asking boaters for feedback on the “magenta line” – the magenta colored overlay on US charts showing the recommended route of travel for the various US intracoastal waterways: New Jersey, Atlantic, Dismal Swamp, Florida West Coast, Gulf West, Gulf East, Okeechobee Lake, and Okeechobee Rim. The line first appeared in 1912, saw a major update in 1935, with only rare updates since then. This has caused many tense moments as the real channel has shifted away from the marked channel leaving boaters confused about the correct path. ActiveCaptain hazard markers have helped with those, “what do I do here?” moments.

The feedback from boaters was heard loud and clear by NOAA. They claim that 99.9% requested that NOAA maintain the magenta line rather than remove it.

How will they go about fixing the magenta line?

That was part 2 of the NOAA Coast Survey announcement. They have added ActiveCaptain to their “cartographic toolkit in the chart evaluation system.” Last year NOAA licensed the ActiveCaptain data for internal use. We wrote some custom software to make it easier for the cartographers to use the hazard data you provide to help update charts and fix the magenta line. The first part of the software has been delivered to NOAA for their use.

NOAA approached us because they were already using the hazard data to locate problems but had to manually search on areas of interest to see what needed attention. Now hazard changes are automatically presented to them so they can quickly go through the changes and determine whether additional surveys or chart changes are needed.”

 

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